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Topic: Literature we love, not necessarily to do with death
Isa Black
Black Magician


Posts: 1118
Joined: Dec. 2001
Posted: Aug. 25 2002,4:25 pm

A teacher of mine gave me a book called "God: A biography", that he says I will enjoy it very much. I have read the introduction and it's rather intriguing, because the writer (a historian!) treats God not as a sacred entity, but as a literary character, thus giving the author the possibility to analyse and criticise him as much as he wants. The book shows God in various aspects, sometimes mercyful, sometimes cruel, sometimes "putting" himself under the control of humans (well, making humans believe he is under their control), and proving that God manipulates us even when we think we're manipulating him.

I think it's worth the read, if anyone wants to, it's a very psychological book.
Ah, yeah, and the author is Jack Miles.

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The grace of Death shall bless us all.


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Cyberhauntress
Azraelite


Posts: 541
Joined: Dec. 2001
Posted: Aug. 25 2002,4:45 pm

Sounds intriguing indeed... And see what I have just found, Isa: http://www.readinggroupguides.com/guides/god.asp
There are some interesting notes regarding Jack Miles' biography as well...

CHss
:grim:

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No Hope = No Fear


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TalN
The Puchan Quark


Posts: 1169
Joined: Sep. 2001
Posted: Aug. 28 2002,1:26 pm

Mon cher Holden!  Bon chance avec le Marquis de Sade.
I think the only thing that could have been more difficult than studying his writings for my senior thesis in french lit, would have been getting my hands on something other than a translation in 1974.  But that should not be so difficult these days.  My professor would have enjoyed it immensely, but had to settle for the dark workings of Jean Cocteau from me.  I hadn't thought about it till now, but he was truly a dark one too.

The mention of Ayn Rand made me realize that I left of an two authors that heavily influenced me in the '80s and '90s......
Rolequaire (better known to most these days as Anne Rice) was essential reading for some of us.  eh, D'aoine?  And her imagergy and powerful writing in those works far surpasses the bulk of work under the name of Rice.

Viola Johnson.  I will not be surprised if her name draws a total blank here, but she is well known for her fiction, socio-political writings, and lectures in her field of expertise.  I cannot say that her works are literary masterpieces, but having seen the impact of her books on others, they are very important works.  Their influence on me has been to document a learning period in my life that was survived with the help of her wise counsel.  For more info on her:
http://www.iron-rose.com/vijohnson/


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daoine o
mistress of the mountains


Posts: 1249
Joined: Feb. 2001
Posted: Aug. 28 2002,5:10 pm

TalN, I have yet to read 'Anne Roquelare' (or whatever) as I'm not all that thrilled with her writings as 'herself'.  I've heard good stuff about that series, but honestly, I'm not into reading erotica.  The only fiction writer of that 'ilk' I'm fond of is Poppy Z. Brite, and most of her raunchier scenes are gay!  But I *love* her writing style.

I tend to read non-fiction pretty much exclusively, whether it's cemetery related, death related, or often occult/Satanic/esoteric/paranormal stuff.  A really good read is 'Lucifer Rising' by Gavin Baddeley...a great treatise on heavy metal, Satanism and the culture surrounding it...it starts with an intelligently written overview and then follows a timeline.  Lots of good pix, too, albeit b&w.

:asthanos:  <---  i'll give A.R.'s 'beauty' a try one of these days...



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grave wishes!

daoine o'


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AGirl
Azraelite


Posts: 250
Joined: April 2001
Posted: Aug. 29 2002,11:30 pm

Two books that have changed my life forever just by reading them have got to be "Les Miserables" by Victor Hugo, both the abridged and unabridged versions, because after reading them both I realized that it was less of a novel and more like the Bible...it's not about the story or the details, but the theme.
The other book is "As I Lay Dying" by William Faulkner, because we read it in highschool and I remember being the only person in my class who described it as "hysterically funny". Come on, though, it is.
For pure enjoyment you can't beat the previously mentioned Tolkien and Frank Herbert novels, and I must admit that I L-O-V-E Ethan Frome by Edith Wharton.
But I'm a bibliophile probably above all my obsessions, so I can't say that I'm too discriminating when it comes to choosing reading material.  I go to Barnes and Noble the way perverts go to the nudie booths, and the way I paw through pages while I'm there can only be described as pornographic.  I think it's near to becoming a physical addiction, because just posting about books is making my fingertips itch.  There are times I'll read anything, and I mean ANYTHING.  When desperate for books I've been known to read formulaic romance novels and even Harry Potter books.  Sigh.

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"Life should not be a journey to the grave with the intention  of arriving safely in an attractive and well-preserved body, but rather to skid in sideways, Champagne in one hand, strawberries in the other, body thoroughly used up, totally worn out and screaming WOO HOO - What a Ride!"

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TalN
The Puchan Quark


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Posted: Aug. 30 2002,10:52 am

Pornographic pawing at B&N....what an ironic image!  But I understand, AGirl.  Non-bibliophiles just cannot understand when I walked into a store that stocks antique books and start breathing deeply - something about the musty smell of crumbling pages and creaking leather binding lures me with the promise of hidden treasure.

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HOLDEN
Friend of Death


Posts: 1778
Joined: Aug. 2001
Posted: Aug. 30 2002,4:17 pm

quote from Jennifer: "i go to Barnes & Noble the way perverts go to nudie booths." :laugh: :clap: :laugh: :clap: :laugh: :clap2: :laugh: :clap2:

you & i are basically alike with regard to that. it is a fine pleasure to communicate with you, comrade. :rose:
1 difference however: i try to avoid giving my money to chain stores & instead reserve it for independent stores.
truly i can lose all sense of the passage of time in bookstores! DANGEROUS PLACES! :laugh:
moving right along...i found a link to a page on the great Robert Crumb, another creator of fine illustrated literature: http://dir.salon.com/people/bc/2000/05/02/crumb/index.html

now for my time & attention some of Crumb's best work has been created PAST the 60s; he has illustrated or adapted Charles Bukowski & Philip K. Dick, for example...just to name 2 more of who i consider The Greats.
i haven't gotten into Bukowski's fiction but i admire his poetry. with Dick, the philosophical essays, short stories, & 2 novels (Radio Free Albemuth, and The Man In The High Castle) do it for me.

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hol


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Leilah
Lady Death


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Joined: Feb. 2001
Posted: Aug. 30 2002,6:00 pm

I agree with Holden! We need to support the independents if we want to continue to see the works of newer/lesser known/obscure/anything NOT mainstream junk. Take some time and explore what's left of your neighborhood new and used independents.

On another note and owing to Taln's post about the wonderful smell of musty books. Dary, you might know this place...Strand's Books in NYC. Lafayette Square, Been there forever, no catagorization, but you could spent a month in there and still not see everything.

If you like old books at great prices, you'' love it!

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"Death stands above me whispering low, I know not what into my ear; Of His strange language all I know is, there is not a word of fear."


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Isa Black
Black Magician


Posts: 1118
Joined: Dec. 2001
Posted: Aug. 30 2002,7:56 pm

Quote
Quote: from Leilah on 6:00 pm on Aug. 30, 2002
On another note and owing to Taln's post about the wonderful smell of musty books. Dary, you might know this place...Strand's Books in NYC. Lafayette Square, Been there forever, no catagorization, but you could spent a month in there and still not see everything.

If you like old books at great prices, you'' love it!


We don't have places like this here :(
Everything is owned by big corporates... and what is not, doesn't sell anything obscure or unknown... :(
The only places I've seen selling "occult" stuff here are wicca related... light oriented...
uh, mainstream "occult" junk...

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The grace of Death shall bless us all.

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Mofoquer
Beast of Xvim


Posts: 1254
Joined: June 2001
Posted: Aug. 30 2002,9:30 pm

There is a place here, in the center area of the town, a place called "Mercado Modelo". It's a plaza(and the sorroundings too) where you can get from a little herb, to a potion; there are lotsa stuff there occult related that you can get, and for a cheap price.

A nice place to visit really :beer:

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In a way, not way....

The sun, the sister | of the moon, from the south
Her right hand cast | over heaven's rim;
No knowledge she had | where her home should be,
The moon knew not | what might was his,
The stars knew not | where their stations were.


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